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The market for finals tickets

September 26th, 2003

The markets for finals tickets provide pretty good evidence on which football code is going to win out in Australia.

Ticket scalping is rife for the AFL Grand Final, despite a Victorian government crackdown. Meanwhile, in the NRL finals, 10 000 tickets have been given away free.

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  1. September 26th, 2003 at 11:20 | #1

    Collingwood uber alles.

  2. derrida derider
    September 26th, 2003 at 14:29 | #2

    Oh God, I might have known. Jack, if I’d known you were a Collingwood supporter I wouldn’t have tried to bother arguing with you!

  3. cs
    September 26th, 2003 at 17:41 | #3

    You seem to have missed a certain code John … hint: they play this one in heaven.

  4. September 26th, 2003 at 19:20 | #4

    Hmm, and those RWC tickets are really selling like hotcakes, too!

  5. Jill Rush
    September 26th, 2003 at 20:47 | #5

    What is amazing is that people get so passionate over something that really doesn’t matter a toss.

    What does that say about the Australian psyche when most people view really important issues as boring? – The rush of adrenalin is a lot cheaper than recreational drugs so it isn’t all bad but is it the one way that men are allowed to brutalise each other in order to score a win?

    One of the teams has the reputation as coming from a group of thugs who beat up any team who beat them on the field. Now it appears that it happens on the field.

    However some men are arguing that there should be the automatic right to joint custody upon separation and divorce as if this violence which so many enjoy either in fact or on TV does not exist.

    Oddly enough the sole fathers I know who have equal rights in relation to children are those who aren’t interested in football. The ones who demand their rights are the ones who, from their punitive attitudes, shouldn’t have it and love a game of footy.

    John Howard is trying to make it diffucult to work things out between warring couples when violence is involved.

    The question we could consider is what place does violence have within our society, how does football contribute and how much do government policies through harsh welfare regimes, support for various footie codes, children behind barbwire, dying of abuse at the hands of relatives, reduce the chances of shared care actually working?.

    Go the lions…

  6. September 27th, 2003 at 01:34 | #6

    Holy gross generalisation, Batman!

    I can’t speak for the rugby codes, but have you actually watched a game of AFL lately? (I can’t really say about soccer – in Australia, more people play it than watch it, so it’s kind of different). The fact that nasty incidents tend to get highlighted and rehashed is because such incidents are pretty isolated. A far cry from the old days when a bit of biffo was de rigeur. A few old-timers complain that the game’s been sanitised, but it’s still fairly physical, it’s just the wanton aspect – king hits and charging – that’s been taken out. In terms of The Spectacle, a great mark or a freak goal wins out over a melee. What’s that? A bunch of blokes giving each other love pats? Booooring.

    Plus you don’t take into account the large number of female fans that AFL attracts, and for what I can tell, it isn’t all that different with League.

    The main concern with Aussie Rules specifically seems to be the grogging on that goes on after the game, particularly in country leagues and its influence on the juniors; if people are looking for a factor why soccer seems to dominate other sports at the junior level, that might have as much to do with it as the risk of injury – oh, and the potential to earn as much in a month playing in Europe as elite AFL players earn in a year, though that’s probably not too much to do with it.

    Plus it’s not just an Australian thing; Americans are obsessed with pro sports, Europeans are obsessed with soccer. Same diff. Though the crowd dynamic there seems to be a lot less friendly, especially in the lower leagues.

    And no, you don’t have to explain to me the belligerent nature of a minority of fathers with regard to their custody arrangements. However, I do think that attributing domestic violence in society as purely being due to “football”, or sport in general, as a rather flippant response to a very serious issue with many factors.

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