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Monday message board

July 9th, 2007

It’s time, once again for the Monday Message Board. As usual, civilised discussion and absolutely no coarse language, please.

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  1. wmmbb
    July 9th, 2007 at 20:04 | #1

    Juan Cole at Salon deals with the terrorists mindset, taking the difficult and disturbing instance of doctors.

    Strange to relate that blowback is linked to occupation and related interference activities in other countries in the frame of a more interconnected world. Perhaps group dynamics, motive and opportunity are critical elements.

    We,or those who speak on our behalf, of course will never conceive, or let it be said, what we would do if what was done to them was done to us.

  2. observa
    July 9th, 2007 at 22:48 | #2

    Here’s the problem for aboriginal apartheid settlements in a nutshell http://www.news.com.au/adelaidenow/story/0,22606,22030204-2682,00.html

    In particular note-

    ‘Mr Alexander said the need to build new police stations was “desperate”.

    Police Minister Paul Holloway has acknowledged the facilities are below standard. But under questioning from Opposition legal affairs spokeswoman Isobel Redmond, he told the Budget Estimates Committee hearing that “getting any capital works built on the APY Lands is an extremely difficult task”.

    “It is very difficult to get work performed there, particularly within budget,” he told the committee.

    Police Commissioner Mal Hyde told the same hearing that accommodation for eight officers on the Lands had just been completed. He said the only police posts not upgraded were at Ernabella and Amata and that was “because we want to build new police stations at those communities”.

    “We did go out to tender for a new station at Amata, and we found that the tendered price far exceeded what had been anticipated in the budget,” he said.

    The price will exceed the tender price as well, he said.

    Mr Hyde said history showed it was extremely difficult to get things built, and quickly, on the Lands.’

    Basically it’s getting impossible to get tradesmen to work in these areas. Tradeys don’t need primary school aged children with cans of petrol around their necks as spectators while they’re working. With the general trades shortage, the married with kids can earn a comfortable living in the cities and the singles can enjoy fly in fly out mining boom wages and conditions without the grief. Basically the SA State Labor Govt is squealing that the costs of building in the remote aboriginal gulags is now prohibitive, if not virtually impossible. As well Federal Labor are also squawking about the general housing affordability crisis and want to start subsidising landlords or some such. If they’re right about an affordability crisis in the cities, then what chance do they(or any govt) have of making a dent in the problem for remote aboriginal infrastructure? None whatsoever if you listen carefully to the Rann Labor Govt. That leaves the luvvies with an unpleasant tuth. Cease supporting uneconomic gulags and this apartheid development, or accept more of the same third world squalour and social outcomes. It’s that simple really.

  3. BilB
    July 10th, 2007 at 09:12 | #3

    Observa,

    I think that if you looked closer the suggestion that it is difficult to get tradies to work on aboriginal lands frames the problem entirely. To send in a flood of workers to build a bunch of inappropriate buildings is the typical administrative ‘patch it’ type solution that has failed repeatedly in these areas. The tradies come, the tradies go, the structures fall apart and every one says that is typical of aboriginal behaviour. If you listen to the aboriginals I am sure that they are saying that “we can build our own communities” it just takes some training time and some funding of an entirely different nature. If the Aboriginal build for themselves then the skills and the commitment to maintain are more likely to persist. It will take longer and the result will not look like Vaucluse, but I am willing to bet that it will cost much less in the long run and be permanent.

    It is very interesting to hear how this is being reported on the BBC (all over the world). It paints Australia in a very poor light. I suggest that some very different thinking, a significantly more lateral approach had better turn up here soon or the problem will become worse again. A good start to achieving that change would be to throw off the suit, put on a loin cloth, go stand in the heat and the dirt, then rethink the approach.

  4. gordon
    July 10th, 2007 at 09:50 | #4

    A terrorist mindset among doctors is, apparently, a consequence of publicly-provided health care. Paul Krugman notes how: “These days terrorism is the first refuge of scoundrels. So when British authorities announced that a ring of Muslim doctors working for the National Health Service was behind the recent failed bomb plot, we should have known what was coming.

    “National healthcare: Breeding ground for terror?â€? read the on-screen headline, as the Fox News host Neil Cavuto and the commentator Jerry Bowyer solemnly discussed how universal health care promotes terrorism…”

  5. July 10th, 2007 at 10:28 | #5

    “National healthcare: Breeding ground for terror?� read the on-screen headline, as the Fox News host Neil Cavuto and the commentator Jerry Bowyer solemnly discussed how universal health care promotes terrorism…�

    Hilarious – I guess it was only a matter of time, particularly with the Michael Moore film out. We all know he’s a big fat terrorist sympathiser.

  6. Bob Durnan
    July 15th, 2007 at 00:50 | #6

    In mid-2003, John Quiggin argued that many problems in Aboriginal communities would not be solved until governments managed to overcome their ideological aversion to job creation programs in those communities and on the surrounding lands.

    Quiggin pointed out that many working class Australians in non-remote areas had access to such programs to tide them through hard times for most of the 20th century. Indigenous communities desperately need them now, but anti-socialist dogmas prevent governments from even thinking about the issue. Now is the time to raise this demand.

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