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New sandpit

April 2nd, 2011

Here’s a new sandpit for lengthy side discussion, rants on idees fixes and so on.

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  1. Ikonclast
    April 3rd, 2011 at 19:31 | #1

    Japan’s situation has already dropped out of general media reporting. It seems difficult to find in-depth information on the continuing nuclear crisis. There also seems to be a dearth of in-depth information on the projected effect on the Japanese and world economy from the combine effects of the tsunami, internal refugee problems, power crisis, manufacturing disruption and radiation crisis.

    Japan is the world’s third largest economy having just been passed by China before this crisis. The Japanese economy was already in the doldrums. I wonder if any estimates have been made of the likely effect on the Japanses GDP for 2011? My guess, as a ball-park range, is that the Japanese economy could contract by 5% to 10% in 2011. It is difficult to see how the Japanese economy can ever return to positive growth given that the world energy peak crisis will now bite along with the need to close all six Fukishima reactors and shelve plans for any more reactors in Japan.

    What proportions of Japan’s total land area and Japan’s arable land area along with Japanese costal fishing grounds have been rendered unusable probably for at least 50 years? The knock-on effects of all these problems will be heavy and far reaching. The blow to Japan could of itself be enough to re-trigger the GFC and initiate the second great depression which is still lurking in the wings.

  2. Paul Norton
    April 4th, 2011 at 09:49 | #2

    On the weekend I heard a radio announcer mispronounce the term “global warming sceptic” as “global warming septic”. It occurs to me that we would do well to start referring to climate change “sceptics” as “climate septics” because:

    1. They are not sceptics in the true sense of the word.

    2. They are full of the stuff that septic tanks contain.

    3. They get all their ideas from American sources.

    4. They are septically contaminated by their association with gruops like the League of Rights and the Central Queensland Christian Free State.

  3. Ikonoclast
    April 4th, 2011 at 10:18 | #3

    @Paul Norton

    I can’t argue with that! :D

  4. jquiggin
    April 4th, 2011 at 20:57 | #4

    Tristan Ewins sent me the following, which he coulnd’t get to post

    I thought John might be interested in this; I mention his support in the past for a regime of half dividend imputation – suggesting such a policy might be adopted by Gillard Labor to fund reform in aged care, mental health, transport infrastructure etc. The context is a broader article about Carbon Tax reform and the structure of any compensation package. If any of you are interested feel welceme to comment there!!

    See: http://leftfocus.blogspot.com/2011/04/labor-and-greens-on-carbon-tax-debate.html

    sincerely,

    Tristan”

  5. Chris O’Neill
    April 5th, 2011 at 08:22 | #5

    What proportions of Japan’s total land area and Japan’s arable land area have been rendered unusable probably for at least 50 years?

    Check how they dealt with Caesium-137 contamination at Bikini Atoll.

    along with Japanese costal fishing grounds

    They’re part of the ocean so will be like the ocean before long.

  6. Christopher Dobbie
    April 5th, 2011 at 08:27 | #6

    I followed the link, read the article but left with the impression that Tristan hangs onto hope that the Labor party somewhere has a core of social justice to implement. It is quite evident that this is wishful thinking, exemplified by your post ‘Menzies’ heir’.

    I’m still reticent about this carbon tax but would be more persuaded if it’s scope was on all carbon liberated from Australian activity.

    So the question is; Will this tax be imposted on export forms of carbon, i.e. coal, natural gas, oil etcetera?

    This also would be one way of shutting up the Bolt and Nuts argument that our attempts have no discernable effect on the overall carbon emissions.

    Australia has 8.9% of the worlds proved recoverable coal and a whopping 26.5% share of world exports of the stuff.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal

  7. Salient Green
    April 6th, 2011 at 08:26 | #7

    I think the tories figured out very early on that the redistribution of carbon tax funds to lower and middle income households would greatly increase Labour’s support base.

    It would explain their rabidly negative response to the carbon tax which I found extaordinary given that pricing carbon was one of their policies.

  8. Alice
    April 6th, 2011 at 20:08 | #8

    I had to find the sandpit for this comment but do we really need any more evidence that US policy, which Australian governments are still adhering to are good economic policies?

    The US has lost its way and as for the (well how do I say stupid politely? maybe suicidal is a better choice) people that continue to vote republican (is it the air or water?)…well they get what they deserve – which is no job, no government, no infrastructure and not much of a life oh and occaisonally to be used to breed cannon fodder without pay.

    They have people in the US government (republicans) rippimg government apart limb by limb.

    Good luck with that one. The average US citizen is going to need all the luck they can get.

    http://www.insideriowa.com/index.cfm?nodeID=17818&audienceID=1&action=display&newsID=12055

  9. paul walter
    April 6th, 2011 at 20:57 | #9

    Re Salient Green’s comment, I wonder if folk watched any of the debate on SBS Insight on the new carbon scheme?
    Gee, depressing.
    Alice, if the general level of intelligence in Australia is such as was indicated on that show, the wonder is that the Americans haven’t walked in and overtly taken the place over already.

  10. Alice
    April 6th, 2011 at 21:21 | #10

    @paul walter
    Paul the only Americans who have the ability to come here and take over….are busy taking over less devloped countries exploiting even cheaper labour.

    Thats the only reason we havent been taken over. The majority of Americans cant afford a holiday here…let alone a takeover and those who can afford a takeover are busy elsehwere.

    Good.

  11. paul walter
    April 6th, 2011 at 21:26 | #11

    In other words, they are as thick as we are..

  12. Salient Green
    April 7th, 2011 at 20:36 | #12

    I just watched Insight online Paul. (I am a Paul also btw). I think Christine Milne did well but I have always been impressed with her. It would be good if she learned to be a bit more authoritative, like Bob. There’s something special about how he retains such dignity and authority under all sorts of interrogation.

    It’s frustrating to see the kind of stupidity on display by the idealogues of the right but it’s better that it be on display for all to see. I don’t think Garnaut’s performance helped a hell of a lot, a bit condesending I think. These battles must be fought though. It is a conflict that is still evolving but will be resolved.

  13. Christopher Dobbie
  14. Salient Green
    April 8th, 2011 at 07:08 | #14

    Thanks Christopher, loved that line to the Murdoch reporter “we had priorities and you didn’t figure”.

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