Home > Economics - General > Blogging the Zombies: Expansionary Austerity – Further Reading

Blogging the Zombies: Expansionary Austerity – Further Reading

December 28th, 2011

Thanks to everyone who has made comments on the drafts of the new chapter of Zombie Economics, on Expansionary Austerity, for the forthcoming paperback edition.  I’m now editing in response, and adding a section on Further Reading. I’d welcome any suggestions for this chapter, as well as any useful references that weren’t in the hardback edition.

Posted via email from John’s posterous

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  1. December 28th, 2011 at 23:17 | #1

    pshhhhhhhhhhhhhhhp

    pshhhhhhhhhhhhhhhp

    pshhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhp

    oh!

    Sorry. Didn’t mean to disturb you. Just spraying those annoying crickets.

    p

  2. CL
    December 30th, 2011 at 02:58 | #2

    Hey, could you please upload the new chapter as pdf? By the way, your book is great :)

  3. December 30th, 2011 at 06:10 | #3

    The book is a fantastic history of economic thought.

    Two books you might like to cite in the paperback edition are:

    Karen Ho. Liquidated, an ethnography of Wall Street.

    Julia Ott. When Wall Street Met Main Street: The Quest for an Investors’ Democracy.

    Ho is an anthropologist who traces the origins of the idea of ‘shareholder value’ and Ott is a historian who takes on the notion that the stock market finances innovation.

  4. hc
    December 31st, 2011 at 02:25 | #4

    The phraseology you use is employed by Krugman here

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/30/opinion/keynes-was-right.html?src=me&ref=general

    Nothing new in his post however.

  5. Charles
    January 1st, 2012 at 07:37 | #5

    Very interesting blog on which John features.

    http://modernmoney.wordpress.com/

  6. January 1st, 2012 at 13:42 | #6

    Little more than a repost of what Prof Quiggin wrote here: http://johnquiggin.com/2011/11/01/occupied-interview/

  7. James Haughton
    January 9th, 2012 at 16:02 | #7

    “Debt: the first 5000 years” by David Graeber is a must read, I think.

  8. John Quiggin
    January 9th, 2012 at 16:07 | #8

    @James I’ve been meaning to get this for quite some time. Definitely must do it soon

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