Home > Boneheaded stupidity, Economic policy > The ultimate non-response response?

The ultimate non-response response?

September 7th, 2012

I quote in full the Audit Commission’s response to my critique, as reported by the Oz

The statement only responds to the findings of the QCU study, and not those of Professor Quiggin.

“There are no other points of substance in his (Quiggin’s) report which warrant a response,” the statement said.

  1. Freelander
    September 7th, 2012 at 22:28 | #1

    If the are unwilling or unable to respond, then either it’s because you’re clearly such a transparently obvious fool that no response is merited, or what you’ve said was said with such power clarity that any attempted response would simply look foolish.

    Haven’t read either the “audit” or the Quiggin “audit of audit” but I know which explanation I’d put my money.

    So getting a non-response inthis case, Excellent! Congratulations! Well done! (Pun intended!)

  2. September 8th, 2012 at 00:36 | #2

    Every time someone links to a Murdoch site a little piece of the internet dies.

  3. Freelander
    September 8th, 2012 at 13:03 | #3

    @Megan

    Theinternet? Not a kitten? Now that is sad!

  4. Freelander
    September 8th, 2012 at 13:03 | #4

    @Megan

    Theinternet? Not a kitten? Now that is sad!

  5. Ikonoclast
    September 8th, 2012 at 15:38 | #5

    Costello, Newman et. al. don’t care. They know they’ve pulled a swifty. They know they’ve gotten away with it. They’re laughing at us right now and saying, “Look at them. They think facts count. They think being right counts.”

  6. Ikonoclast
    September 8th, 2012 at 15:38 | #6

    Costello, Newman et. al. don’t care. They know they’ve pulled a swifty. They know they’ve gotten away with it. They’re laughing at us right now and saying, “Look at them. They think facts count. They think being right counts.”

  7. Ernestine Gross
    September 8th, 2012 at 18:38 | #7

    IMHO, JQ’s critique of the auditor’s methodology regarding projecting data pertaining the extreme natural and institutional environments is central.

    It is astounding to read using the methodology of rating agencies constitutes a ‘defence’! This methodology is a major contributing factor to the GFC.

  8. Ernestine Gross
    September 8th, 2012 at 18:38 | #8

    IMHO, JQ’s critique of the auditor’s methodology regarding projecting data pertaining the extreme natural and institutional environments is central.

    It is astounding to read using the methodology of rating agencies constitutes a ‘defence’! This methodology is a major contributing factor to the GFC.

  9. Freelander
    September 8th, 2012 at 23:34 | #9

    @Ernestine Gross

    The rating agencies are simply not qualified to do their job. The insurance industry is, thankfully highly regulated and they employ actuaries who are extremely well educated for what they are called in to do. Seems any clown can issue a ‘rating’, and the CDSs which were dream up by the finance industry were ‘invented’ simply to do what insurance could do but to be categorised as not insurance and therefore not subject to that industries regulations, and theCDSs were the worst component of an evil brew. If actuaries had have done the assessments they wouldn’t have missed the rather obvious danger of all those insurance policies needing to be paid out at the same time.

  10. Freelander
    September 8th, 2012 at 23:34 | #10

    @Ernestine Gross

    The rating agencies are simply not qualified to do their job. The insurance industry is, thankfully highly regulated and they employ actuaries who are extremely well educated for what they are called in to do. Seems any clown can issue a ‘rating’, and the CDSs which were dream up by the finance industry were ‘invented’ simply to do what insurance could do but to be categorised as not insurance and therefore not subject to that industries regulations, and theCDSs were the worst component of an evil brew. If actuaries had have done the assessments they wouldn’t have missed the rather obvious danger of all those insurance policies needing to be paid out at the same time.

  11. Troy Prideaux
    September 9th, 2012 at 00:01 | #11

    Ikonoclast :
    Costello, Newman et. al. don’t care. They know they’ve pulled a swifty. They know they’ve gotten away with it. They’re laughing at us right now and saying, “Look at them. They think facts count. They think being right counts.”

    Sounds to me like they suckered the Qld electorate in a ripper, so maybe their confidence in their BS is riding high.

  12. Troy Prideaux
    September 9th, 2012 at 00:01 | #12

    Ikonoclast :
    Costello, Newman et. al. don’t care. They know they’ve pulled a swifty. They know they’ve gotten away with it. They’re laughing at us right now and saying, “Look at them. They think facts count. They think being right counts.”

    Sounds to me like they suckered the Qld electorate in a ripper, so maybe their confidence in their BS is riding high.

  13. BilB
    September 9th, 2012 at 08:20 | #13

    Well that can only be seen as good, being dismissed out of hand by establishment. You are in the good company of many thousands with the span of centuries of tradition from Galileo to Rowling (JK).

  14. BilB
    September 9th, 2012 at 08:20 | #14

    Well that can only be seen as good, being dismissed out of hand by establishment. You are in the good company of many thousands with the span of centuries of tradition from Galileo to Rowling (JK).

  15. Freelander
    September 9th, 2012 at 08:59 | #15

    This is what you have when your choice is dumb or dumber, and worse or worser, and citizens are compelled to keep the charade of democracy going by voting. These clowns whose hands forever stay uncomfortably in your pocket need not even make the effort to turn out the vote. With the American circus as an alternative example, not even easy to say if this is a good or a bad thing.

  16. Freelander
    September 9th, 2012 at 08:59 | #16

    This is what you have when your choice is dumb or dumber, and worse or worser, and citizens are compelled to keep the charade of democracy going by voting. These clowns whose hands forever stay uncomfortably in your pocket need not even make the effort to turn out the vote. With the American circus as an alternative example, not even easy to say if this is a good or a bad thing.

  17. Freelander
    September 9th, 2012 at 09:03 | #17

    @BilB

    You make my point. The rejection can be for good reason or bad, and so the company, you giving one from both columns.

  18. Freelander
    September 9th, 2012 at 09:03 | #18

    @BilB

    You make my point. The rejection can be for good reason or bad, and so the company, you giving one from both columns.

  19. Freelander
    September 9th, 2012 at 09:08 | #19

    What is it with these kittens? So many kittens, so little water!

  20. Freelander
    September 9th, 2012 at 09:08 | #20

    What is it with these kittens? So many kittens, so little water!

  21. Katz
    September 9th, 2012 at 10:40 | #21

    Costello has repeated his trick of 1996.

    Newman will continue to be chuffed until headlines reveal how many punters are dying on gurneys in hospital corridors.

  22. Katz
    September 9th, 2012 at 10:40 | #22

    Costello has repeated his trick of 1996.

    Newman will continue to be chuffed until headlines reveal how many punters are dying on gurneys in hospital corridors.

  23. September 9th, 2012 at 11:54 | #23

    @ Katz, that’s been a feature of the labor mismanagement of Qld health. They’ve thrown money at it by the bucketload, serving only to prove beyond any doubt that they couldn’t run a chook raffle.
    The only outcome was a fiefdom of bureacrats in the hospital system. Making them redundant will be a good start.
    Some actual Doctors, Nurses & beds will be a good way to start fixing the legacy of culpable incompetence the ALP has left behind.
    It is likely that in the last 20 years or so, the ALP did not do one thing positive for Qld.
    A legacy that has labor supporters hanging their heads in shame.

  24. September 9th, 2012 at 11:54 | #24

    @ Katz, that’s been a feature of the labor mismanagement of Qld health. They’ve thrown money at it by the bucketload, serving only to prove beyond any doubt that they couldn’t run a chook raffle.
    The only outcome was a fiefdom of bureacrats in the hospital system. Making them redundant will be a good start.
    Some actual Doctors, Nurses & beds will be a good way to start fixing the legacy of culpable incompetence the ALP has left behind.
    It is likely that in the last 20 years or so, the ALP did not do one thing positive for Qld.
    A legacy that has labor supporters hanging their heads in shame.

  25. BilB
    September 9th, 2012 at 12:00 | #25

    That sounds like a party political press release, Steve at the Pub.

  26. BilB
    September 9th, 2012 at 12:00 | #26

    That sounds like a party political press release, Steve at the Pub.

  27. Katz
    September 9th, 2012 at 12:11 | #27

    Perhaps I should have said “dying in even larger numbers on gurneys in hospital corridors.”

  28. Katz
    September 9th, 2012 at 12:11 | #28

    Perhaps I should have said “dying in even larger numbers on gurneys in hospital corridors.”

  29. September 9th, 2012 at 19:31 | #29

    You get the feeling that the hawkish state LN/P governments are just a dry run for the possibly forthcoming Abbott federal L/NP, preparing to pounce on Swan’s mother of all budget black holes. Time to rev up teachers, nurses and construction unions.

  30. September 9th, 2012 at 19:31 | #30

    You get the feeling that the hawkish state LN/P governments are just a dry run for the possibly forthcoming Abbott federal L/NP, preparing to pounce on Swan’s mother of all budget black holes. Time to rev up teachers, nurses and construction unions.

  31. John Quiggin
    September 9th, 2012 at 20:14 | #31
  32. John Quiggin
    September 9th, 2012 at 20:14 | #32
  33. Katz
    September 9th, 2012 at 20:59 | #33

    The wisdom of Campbell Newman, from JQ’s link:

    “Bottom line is, if you ring the number because the house is on fire, the fire brigade will turn up. If you’ve got a problem and you need police, the police will turn up, if you go to a hospital there’ll be nurses and doctors to look after you.

    Of course, the last thing on the mind of this trusting patient is the state of the vast, complex and expensive infrastructure that in a modern health system enables the work of these doctors and nurses.

    Ignorance is bliss until the patient finds herself whiling away many hours on a corridor gurney. That’s why it is convenient to believe in Newman’s cheerful platitudes, until it is too late.

  34. Katz
    September 9th, 2012 at 20:59 | #34

    The wisdom of Campbell Newman, from JQ’s link:

    “Bottom line is, if you ring the number because the house is on fire, the fire brigade will turn up. If you’ve got a problem and you need police, the police will turn up, if you go to a hospital there’ll be nurses and doctors to look after you.

    Of course, the last thing on the mind of this trusting patient is the state of the vast, complex and expensive infrastructure that in a modern health system enables the work of these doctors and nurses.

    Ignorance is bliss until the patient finds herself whiling away many hours on a corridor gurney. That’s why it is convenient to believe in Newman’s cheerful platitudes, until it is too late.

  35. rog
    September 9th, 2012 at 22:25 | #35

    According to this piece it is that frontline services are to be protected, not frontline jobs. Perhaps STAP could explain how this new system is to operate.

    http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/unions-warn-of-unprotected-strike-action-in-response-to-130-jobs-being-cut-from-health-sector-in-townsville-region/story-e6freon6-1226464008301#

  36. rog
    September 9th, 2012 at 22:25 | #36

    According to this piece it is that frontline services are to be protected, not frontline jobs. Perhaps STAP could explain how this new system is to operate.

    http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/unions-warn-of-unprotected-strike-action-in-response-to-130-jobs-being-cut-from-health-sector-in-townsville-region/story-e6freon6-1226464008301#

  37. Dan
    September 10th, 2012 at 10:51 | #37

    SATP: the other thing that bureaucrats do is design and implement public health and subacute programs so that the demand for doctors, nurses and hospital beds is less acute (pun intended).

  38. Dan
    September 10th, 2012 at 10:51 | #38

    SATP: the other thing that bureaucrats do is design and implement public health and subacute programs so that the demand for doctors, nurses and hospital beds is less acute (pun intended).

  39. Ernestine Gross
    September 10th, 2012 at 11:20 | #39

    “We want local boards to engage in strategies that produce more efficient outcomes.”

    Suppose the only strateg to achieve ‘more efficient outcomes’ in a ‘full information economy’ is to remove the local boards. Would this be feasible in a ‘bounded rational economy’?

  40. Ernestine Gross
    September 10th, 2012 at 11:20 | #40

    “We want local boards to engage in strategies that produce more efficient outcomes.”

    Suppose the only strateg to achieve ‘more efficient outcomes’ in a ‘full information economy’ is to remove the local boards. Would this be feasible in a ‘bounded rational economy’?

  41. September 10th, 2012 at 12:29 | #41

    Looking at Prof Q’s Conclusions, one of my conclusions is that he hasn’t mastered the Keep with Next formatting option in Word, resulting in widows and orphans.

  42. September 10th, 2012 at 12:29 | #42

    Looking at Prof Q’s Conclusions, one of my conclusions is that he hasn’t mastered the Keep with Next formatting option in Word, resulting in widows and orphans.

  43. Freelander
    September 10th, 2012 at 12:53 | #43

    @Ernestine Gross

    Why not more ambitious “wants” if wants is all that is required fo “efficient outcomes”? Swords into ploughshares anyone? Why not “want” the outcomes from unpaid six year old kids? Same desired outcome, simply delivered cheaper (assuming that is).

  44. Freelander
    September 10th, 2012 at 12:53 | #44

    @Ernestine Gross

    Why not more ambitious “wants” if wants is all that is required fo “efficient outcomes”? Swords into ploughshares anyone? Why not “want” the outcomes from unpaid six year old kids? Same desired outcome, simply delivered cheaper (assuming that is).

  45. Tom
    September 10th, 2012 at 13:49 | #45

    The Critique of the Audit Commission is well written and have revealed the absurd practice used by the Audit Commission to reach the figure they want. In my opinion, they are not even trying to defend themselves because they are betting on the general public to not read the paper, so they can hide what they are actually doing.

  46. Tom
    September 10th, 2012 at 13:49 | #46

    The Critique of the Audit Commission is well written and have revealed the absurd practice used by the Audit Commission to reach the figure they want. In my opinion, they are not even trying to defend themselves because they are betting on the general public to not read the paper, so they can hide what they are actually doing.

  47. September 11th, 2012 at 09:34 | #47

    This is a test to see if the echo effect is universal. I have filled in all three ID fields and ticked none of the boxes. i will click the submit button just once.

  48. September 11th, 2012 at 09:36 | #48

    Well that was interesting. How come I only posted once and everybody else twice?

  49. Mike Smith
    September 12th, 2012 at 09:06 | #49

    John, I’ve read your review cover to cover a couple of times – an excellent and useful document – and I’m now distributing far and wide!

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