Weekend reflections

It’s time again for weekend reflections, which makes space for longer than usual comments on any topic. Civilised discussion and no coarse language please.

140 thoughts on “Weekend reflections

  1. @Jim Rose

    Whether someone is legally guilt of wrongdoing or actually guilty of wrongdoing are two quite separate matters.

    Here, the basic facts were not in question. If relied upon, they showed Stevens was guilty. He could not be convicted because a higher public interest — the probity of the prosecutorial team, questions of discovery etc … — warranted overturning the case.

    Even a dirty dealer can get an unfair trial — and Stevens was easily that.

    I am sure if some scumbag armed and violent criminal home-invader who had far fewer defects in his persecution [ha, what a Freudian slip! FB] and in his evidence processing, the criminal-as-anti-hero left with demand a not guilty verdict without reservation.

    What you are sure of is neither here nor there, since they tend to be of your own invention. The fact of the matter here is that some corrupt proponent of the business classes ran afoul of his own deregulatory environment. One can’t say fairer than that.

  2. @Chris Warren
    what do you want to bring back?

    the two airline policy? banks opening at 10 and closing at 3? no competition in telecommunications? no interstate power market? double-digit inflation and unemployment?

  3. @Jim Rose
    I want to bring back some decent public services and some common sense about making sure the domestic economy is functioning well. Id like to see the ratty free markets privatise or perish models… done and dusted as they say.

  4. Jim Rose :@Chris Warren what do you want to bring back?
    the two airline policy? banks opening at 10 and closing at 3? no competition in telecommunications? no interstate power market? double-digit inflation and unemployment?

    Maybe a 10 airline policy

    Let each union have their own bank

    Free public telecommunications

    transparent markets

    zero inflation

    full employment.

    But you can only get these if you regulate capitalists and close-off their selfserving monopolistic practices which flourish under deregulation.

  5. @Chris Warren
    what is in place to stop regulatory capture?

    regulation is inspired by the drive of businessman to limit competition. It was not the existence of monopoly which caused the government to intervene in the economy, but the lack of it.

    large corporations reacted to the free market by turning to government to protect their inefficiency from the discipline of market conditions. regulation is designed to curb the grown in competition and to cripple smaller competitors for the benefit of larger firms

  6. Fran @ 18 said;

    “the promotion of arrant metaphysical nonsense ”

    I hope your pagan worship of the sun god is right for your sake, otherwise you run the risk of being struck by lightning, maybe be careful when you go outside in a storm and don’t stand under any trees (if you can find any left).

  7. Jim Rose :@Chris Warren what is in place to stop regulatory capture?

    You might not want to – depends on the circumstances

    SOME regulation is inspired by the drive of businessman to limit competition. It was not the existence of monopoly which caused the government to intervene in the economy, but the lack of it.
    blockquote>

  8. @Chris Warren
    Do you want to go back to the good old days and ban Pay TV? fewer free-to air channels? No ABC 2? No FM radio? no colour TV? all were delayed for decades by regulation.

    how good were packer and co. in dictating broadcasting policy?

    “Free public telecommunications”??????? that might appeal to middle-class misers trying to get the working class to pay their internet bill, but how does that help the homeless and the poor?

    Has the predication of the immiserisation of the proletariat been discredited to the point that the battle cry is now let no child live without a free mobile phone?

  9. @Jim Rose
    When asked for specifics, many progressives shy away because they would be revealed as double-secret self-hating rogernomics gnomes.

    progressives do not want to bring back the fruits of regulation in the 1970s and, most of all, the heady days of the Menzies era, which were:
    • the two airline policy
    • banks opening at 10 and closing at 3
    • no competition in telecommunications
    • no interstate power market
    • double-digit inflation and unemployment
    • No Pay TV
    • Fewer free-to air channels?
    • No ABC 2?
    • No FM radio?
    • No colour TV?

    Progressives must rise above nit-picking and a fear of change despite not wanting to undo most of the specific changes when pressed. The above list is an example.

  10. Jim,
    Perhaps you could add in that international flights were so expensive that generally only the rich could afford them due to regulation – and many, many other things that were denied to the poor for the same reasons.
    .
    On regulation – that is a point I have been making for a long time and Alice and friends have tried to ignore it. Regulation, by and large, ends up helping the large incumbent players and hurting the smaller, more innovative ones. You see it in our banking system, supermarkets and just about every other business you happen to look at.
    This must be hiding in plain sight, as they keep missing it.
    They seem to imagine that there is this magical set of regulations somewhere that can guarantee:
    A 10 airline policy
    Let each union have their own bank
    Free public telecommunications
    transparent markets
    zero inflation
    full employment.
    Pity that it has never happened. 🙂

  11. @Andrew Reynolds
    thanks

    self-deception is important in political beliefs as in most cases, we can believe what we like at no personal cost.

    after blaming a lack of regulation for a global economic crisis, many of these same critics give the same failed agencies and same governments run by the same party that ushered in the crisis more power that could be captured and abused by well-organised groups and the expressive voter and the rationally irrational voter.

    in most cases, the crisis flowed from regulatory failures, such as too big to fail, regulatory preferment to the politically influential, and loose monetary policies across the OECD area.

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