The failure of privatisation and the case for a fully public TAFE system

I have a new article in The Conversation, riffing off ACCC chairman Rod Sims’ recent denunciation of privatisation policy in Australia. The Conversation’s ran with the headline “People have lost faith in privatisation and it’s easy to see why“. To be slightly more precise, when privatisation started in the 1980s, most people had an open mind on the issue – there was plenty of dissatisfaction with public enterprises like Telecom Australia. As they experienced privatisation, they became more hostile and, eventually, implacably so, even as the political class remained convinced of the merits of the idea. The successive defeats of the Bligh (Labor) and Newman (LNP) governments in Queensland illustrate the point. The rare cases when privatising governments have been elected or re-elected usually arise only when the Opposition is utterly unelectable (Baird in NSW for example).

Part of Sims speech and my article referred to the continuing disaster of for-profit vocational education. Right on cue, the day the piece came out, the Victorian government terminated the contracts of another 18 shonky providers (though they are still registered with the national regulator ASQA), with the students being directed to the public TAFE system.

Billions of dollars are being wasted and thousands of lives ruined by this continuing policy disaster. Yet, it seems, no one in authority is willing to admit that the whole idea of publicly funded for-profit education is a disaster, guaranteed to generate scams and rorts on an industrial scale. The whole system needs to be shut down and replaced by a fully public TAFE system. The minority of for-profit providers who are doing a decent job could be hired as subcontractors to teach TAFE courses.

26 thoughts on “The failure of privatisation and the case for a fully public TAFE system

  1. Slightly off topic, but the quote is too good to miss. The privatised Family Day Care rort has been going on for a long time, in many forms, but the latest is a bogus scheme that appears to have creamed $27million dollars from state and commonwealth sources. To quote the ABC web site from 16/0/2016; Police have been unable to locate a massive portion of the $27 million and are investigating whether the money was defrauded to fund IS, potentially making Australian taxpayers one of the biggest funders of the terrorist group.. It appears that the utopian dream of unfettered markets has yet again landed face first in the mud. Or maybe that is the idea?

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