I can’t work with her: Turnbull

I read this headline and my immediate thought was that Putin, antivax and the disastrous WA election had finally galvanised our hapless PM into breaking with Pauline Hanson. Alas, it turns out the “her” in question was the newly elected ACTU Secretary Sally McManus, who had dared to espouse the doctrine that it is sometimes appropriate to break unjust laws. McManus joins the company of such monsters as Martin Luther King, Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela. Fortunately for Malcolm, all of these lawbreakers have one thing in common that ensures that, were they still alive, Pauline Hanson would be doing her best to keep them out of the country. He can rest easy knowing that he stands with all the “ordinary” (sound of dog whistle here) Australians represented by the One Nation faction of his coalition.

41 thoughts on “I can’t work with her: Turnbull

  1. @Ikonoclast
    My joke was “Canada, the country where you rush home from the shop to put the milk in the fridge before it freezes.”

    That’s a joke? It sound’s like a simple statement of fact to me.

  2. @jrkrideau

    It sounds like an urban legend

    Urban legends are the self-identification practised by the disconnected classes !

    Perhaps open water in winter time?

    Yeah, that was the only one I could come up with too – a greater area of surface water in the dunny bowl than on a big, totally frozen-over lake. Except for the thin bits where the ice-skaters have fallen through, that is.

    to put the milk in the fridge before it freezes.”

    That’s a joke? It sound’s like a simple statement of fact to me.

    Well there ya go – I thought that maybe the joke was the offer of “iced tea”.

  3. @jrkrideau

    in cold weather the tires freeze flat and it can take a couple of kilometres driving before they go round again.

    And I thought it was cold back when I lived in Canberra and parked my car outside and experienced one-, two-, or three-bucket mornings (kinda on the analogy of one-, two- or three-dog nights). That is, how many buckets of warm water I had to slowly pour onto the windscreen before it warmed up enough so the cold wouldn’t just freeze the warm water before it ran off the glass.

    But not as bad as the Trans-Siberian Railway repair crews: apparently they had to park their repair truck over a hole in the ground so that they could pile up wood and light a fire under it. If they just drove off instead then the truck was liable to simply shatter.

    But the best one I saw on a teev doco once was how long it took to bury someone in deepest Siberia: several days, apparently because the ground was utterly frozen but the people could only dig for about half an hour at a time lest their lungs freeze and shatter. They could work in shifts, but only for just so long anyway.

  4. Is that a statement or evidence-based ? Please nominate one conviction for any violent offence of a CMMEU member. If you are relying on Dyson’s “utterances” I read his ruling yesterday when he did not disqualified himself as he found that to withdraw from a Liberal Party eventin the middle of his RC when the media had discovered his hitherto unknown acceptance was to manage the situation to avoid the perception of bias in the malevolent – really what BS!

  5. Sorry CFMEU
    I was only talking to a senior lawyer yesterday whose client was assisted incidentally when a famous debt collector went to “collect” money owed by a developer who was not paying his “subbies”. It was the solicitor client’s good fortune when the thug[not a member of the CFMEU] threatened the contractor who instantly paid by cheque his friend only to do the same to the solicitor’s client who just happened to be there! Consider the rule of law there as the fortunate creditor was owed nearly $100,000. The developer may be only ignoring his civil obligations if no fraud involved and the thug may have a defence under section 22 of our Criminal Code.

  6. As Dickens had one of his characters utter:”….The law is an ass!” It is too slow, too pendantic and given over to selective deafness. If you have a lot of money, just like our Prime Minister, then you can hire expensive legal teams to fight the legal maze. But if you are a member of the working poor, or even the working lower income class, then the only lawyer you see is the legal aid lawyer. It’s well and good to talk about using the law for bashing down the rights of workers, but politicians should remember that workers are voters and have long memories.

  7. “It’s well and good to talk about using the law for bashing down the rights of workers, but politicians should remember that workers are voters and have long memories.”

    But with reference to the way Turnbull is accusing Shorten and the unions of selling workers out, there are a lot of short and false memories out there.

    Turnbull’s attempt to misrepresent what actually happened back when Labor was neo-liberal and did accommodate employers demands by negotiating deals that traded worker rights for employer profits needs to be countered.

    Labor needs to explain why they did this and why the false memories that some people have about union thuggery are the result of propaganda and it also needs to be explained to young people who have no memories or understanding of why we need unions why and how unions came to have such a bad reputation.

  8. Agree totally Greg I worked at Legal Aid for many years and was regarded as eccentric as I used to analyse the evidence and law. I have been told recently they do not listen to Police tapes because of time constraints ! I am sure any good lawyer would know exactly what I mean.

  9. @Julie Thomas
    Well for every Norm Gallagher, there’s always a Jack Mundey, isn’t there.

    My recall – very hazy – of the Bill Shorten AWU days was that he did – or at least claims to have – gotten other benefits for full time workers for whatever other “benefits” he traded away. Certainly, there was nothing emerging from Abboot’s ‘Union Inquisition’ that Shorten was ever charged over.

    But yeah, the “neoliberal days” weren’t good, and still aren’t.

  10. We need more outspoken leaders like Sally McManus with the courage to speak out for workers. Bravo Sally keep standing up for workers!

  11. @GrueBleen
    That is, how many buckets of warm water I had to slowly pour onto the windscreen before it warmed up enough so the cold wouldn’t just freeze the warm water before it ran off the glass.
    Jebus, try that on a a cold day in Edmonton or Banff and you lose the windscreen. It would just shatter. I’m shuddering at the very thought.

    In Canada we have windscreen scrapers /snow brushes and in-car heaters to a)keep the passengers from congealing and b) keep the windscreens clear. http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/automotive/car-safety-security/snow-brushes-scrapers.html

    Often the rear window will have heating filaments in it and in the last few years most of the more luxurious cars also have heated seats.

    And in really cold areas we have block heaters to keep the lubricating oil in the engine liquid enough for the engine to turn over fast enough to start. If you are leaving the car parked outside overnight one plugs the heater in. Some parking lots in many parts of Canada also have plug-ins I believe. I live in the tropical south where it seldom goes below -20C so we don’t need them.

    I used to know some people who worked in the North and they said that you never turned off any heavy diesel-powered equipment in the winter. If it was not it use, it just sat there idling. Diesels are notoriously hard to start in cold weather.

  12. @jrkrideau
    And, apart from the historical accident of possibly being born there, you live in Canada why ?

    For comparison, I just looked it up and the coldest temperature ever recorded in Melbourne was apparently -2.8C in July 1869. There wasn’t actually much Melbourne then (the place was only started back in 1835) so no city ‘hot spot’ to raise temperatures. It did get appreciably colder than that in Canberra though – around -10.0C at times – because of the ‘continental climate’ (but of course).

    But never mind, as anthropogenic warming accelerates, it’ll only be a short while before you’re picking fresh dakka bananas off your backyard tree.

  13. @GrueBleen
    /And, apart from the historical accident of possibly being born there, you live in Canada why ?
    What other reason? I have complained for years that if my great-grandfather had just gotten arrested and deported to Australia I’d be on nice sandy beach right now.

    Other than than it’s probably one of the top 10 countries for a normal citizen to live in in the world? Civilized, decent, reasonably honest government and police, nice weather (at times) variety–ski one day , swim the next, (well if you live near Vancouver), big mountains, prairies, a few thousand lakes, forests, nice cities, excellent standard of living and health care and so on. A bit like Australia but with a bit different weather.

    Besides all those horror stories about cold while true are just a matter of course for a Canadian. Heck I even know a few immigrants from warmer climates who say that they really enjoy the four seasons. We are used to it , we build for it and dress for it. That said, a lot of people like to take a winter holiday in Florida or the Caribbean.

    We just like to stress the worst for the tourists. We would be horrified to put up with your heatwave/drought/bush fires or the Queensland cyclones. And you guys have poisonous snakes!

    Canada can be gorgeous in summer and, if you like any winter sports, winter can be great. Strange as it may sound, a nice walk on a bright sunny winter morning at -15 or so is lovely. I know a number of Canadians who greatly prefer cold weather. They would be horrified to find themselves in Melbourne or Brisbane.

    Hop a plane and come visit in January; you’ll enjoy yourself.

    But never mind, as anthropogenic warming accelerates, it’ll only be a short while before you’re picking fresh dakka bananas off your backyard tree.
    No idea what a dakka banana is but kudzu, the plant that ate the south has been sighted in the extreme south of Southern Ontario. This is NOT good.

  14. @jrkrideau

    if my great-grandfather had just gotten arrested and deported to Australia I’d be on nice sandy beach right now.

    And enjoying every minute of it, of course.

    A bit like Australia but with a bit different weather.

    Hmm, that’s kinda like saying a dakka banana (and if you haven’t ever tried one, Google it and see what you’re missing) is just like an avocado but with a bit different appearance and taste.

    And you guys have poisonous snakes!

    Oh yeah, do we ever what. Especially the inland taipan: reputedly the most venomous snake in the world – but with a very low kill rate because we usually manage to avoid them and we do have anti-venom. Supposedly 21 of the 25 most venomous snakes in the world are Australian. And add to that funnel-web spiders (world’s most venomous), redback spiders, box jellyfish, stonefish, and cone snails. Not to mention crocodiles, goannas and sharks (including regular visits from hungry Great Whites). The goannas aren’t quite as bad as the Indonesian monitors (Komodos) which grow up to 3m, but one variety, the perentie (V. giganteus), can grow over 2.5 m (8.2 ft) in length. Do not stand still in it’s presence lest it thinks you are a tree and tries to climb you.

    So avoiding all these things is what fills in for us the time we don’t have to spend dressing up to avoid freezing to death – but then I guess you can dress up to avoid freezing whereas it’s fairly hard to dress down to avoid cooking on those days when it’s over 40C in the shade (which it gets to, even in Mediterranean Melbourne).

    Canada can be gorgeous in summer…. I know a number of Canadians who greatly prefer cold weather. They would be horrified to find themselves in Melbourne or Brisbane. Hop a plane and come visit in January; you’ll enjoy yourself.

    Much as I might like to, my days of jetsetting are well and truly over (never having actually started 🙂 ) But I do confess that the idea of a trip on the cross-Canada railway has always been a bit of an emotional turnon. Yes, I know a lot of the journey is just flat plains with all the spectacular stuff near the coasts, but then for a nation that has the trans-Nullabor rail – with the world’s longest stretch of straight rail at 478 km – we Aussies understand such things.

  15. Heck prairies are not that long if you are actually going coast to coasts

    BTW a famous song–often called the unofficial anthem of Québec

    Gilles Vigneault song “Mon pays”

    “Mon pays, ce n’est pas un pays, c’est l’hiver” (“My country is not a country, it’s winter”)

    Giles did the photos himself

  16. @jrkrideau

    Heck prairies are not that long if you are actually going coast to coasts

    Hmm, well according to the web, the distance from Ontario to the Rockies – ie the distance across the prairies – is 1974 Km (though that does go to Wyoming). For comparison, the distance across the Nullabor is about 1675 Km (going via the Eyre Highway). But the distance from Townsville to Perth (the longest non-stop flight in Australia, I think) is 3396 Km.

    Giles’ song is quite dramatic, but it strained my 50+ year-old high school French somewhat. I caught a bi of it though – the same as I always caught a bit of Charles Trenet’s La Mer.

    But just for you, something that could be called an unofficial Australian anthem:
    www youtube com/watch?v=P1KH9qBWK1E

    (just stick a couple of ‘.’s back in – I’m trying to miss moderation)

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